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Chaparral Village Dental & Orthodontics

27287 Nicolas Road Suite 104, Temecula, CA 92591

951-676-7200

Office blog

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How do dentists detect and treat hidden tooth decay

Posted on January 7, 2018 at 2:16 AM Comments comments (9)




























     













       












                                                                        

Best of Temecula award 2017

Posted on September 9, 2017 at 6:03 PM Comments comments (1)


Press Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
            
Chaparral Village Dental Receives 2017 Best of Temecula Award
           
Temecula Award Program Honors the Achievement

TEMECULA August 31, 2017 -- Chaparral Village Dental has been selected for the 2017 Best of Temecula Award in the Dentistry category by the Temecula Award Program.

Each year, the Temecula Award Program identifies companies that we believe have achieved exceptional marketing success in their local community and business category. These are local companies that enhance the positive image of small business through service to their customers and our community. These exceptional companies help make the Temecula area a great place to live, work and play.
           
Various sources of information were gathered and analyzed to choose the winners in each category. The 2017 Temecula Award Program focuses on quality, not quantity. Winners are determined based on the information gathered both internally by the Temecula Award Program and data provided by third parties.
           
About Temecula Award Program

The Temecula Award Program is an annual awards program honoring the achievements and accomplishments of local businesses throughout the Temecula area. Recognition is given to those companies that have shown the ability to use their best practices and implemented programs to generate competitive advantages and long-term value.

The Temecula Award Program was established to recognize the best of local businesses in our community. Our organization works exclusively with local business owners, trade groups, professional associations and other business advertising and marketing groups. Our mission is to recognize the small business community's contributions to the U.S. economy.
SOURCE: Temecula Award Program

CONTACT:
Temecula Award Program
Email: [email protected]
URL: http://www.onlineawarded.org
###

Chewing your food could protect against infection

Posted on August 20, 2017 at 1:53 AM Comments comments (1)
The study, recently published in the journal Immunity, found that chewing food - otherwise known as mastication - can stimulate the release of T helper 17 (Th17) cells in the mouth.

Th17 cells form a part of the adaptive immune system, which uses specific antigens to defend against potentially harmful pathogens, while enduring "friendly" bacteria that can be beneficial to health.

According to the study team, led by Dr. Joanne Konkel of the University of Manchester in the United Kingdom, in the gut and the skin, Th17 cells are produced through the presence of friendly bacteria.

However, the researchers note that the mechanisms by which Th17 cells are produced in the mouth have been unclear.

Chewing 'can induce a protective immune response in our gums'

Dr. Konkel and colleagues note that the mechanical force required by mastication leads to physiological abrasion and damage in the mouth.

With this in mind, the team set out to investigate whether such damage might play a role in oral Th17 cell production.

The researchers came to their findings by feeding weaning mice soft-textured foods, which required less chewing, until they reached 24 weeks of age. At 24 weeks, the release of Th17 cells in the rodents' mouths was measured.

A significant reduction in oral Th17 cell production was noted, which the team speculated was down to a reduction in mastication-induced physiological damage.

Confirming their theory, the researchers found that increasing the levels of physiological damage in the rodents' mouths - by rubbing the oral cavity with a sterile cotton applicator - led to an increase in the production of Th17 cells.

Dr. Konkel and colleagues believe these findings indicate that chewing food may help to protect us from illness.

The downsides of excessive mastication

However, the researchers caution that increased oral Th17 cell production may not always be beneficial; too many of these cells can increase the risk of periodontitis, or gum disease, which has been associated with numerous other health conditions, including diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis. 
 
In their study, the team also found that long-term exposure to physiological damage caused by mastication can exacerbate the effects of periodontitis.
 
They came to this finding by feeding weaning mice hardened food pellets up until 24 weeks of age.
 
Compared with mice fed soft food, the mice fed hard food showed more mastication-induced physiological damage in their mouths and increased periodontal bone loss.

Still, the researchers believe that their findings could lead to new strategies to combat an array of illnesses. "Importantly, because  inflammation in the mouth is linked to development of diseases all around the body," says Dr. Konkel, "understanding the tissue-specific factors that regulate immunity at the oral barrier could eventually lead to new ways to treat multiple inflammatory conditions."

How Oral Health Affects the Rest of You

Posted on June 12, 2017 at 11:55 AM Comments comments (8)

"Show me your teeth, and I will tell you who you are," declared preeminent 18th-century naturalist George Cuvier. The guy was onto something.

Click HERE to read this excellent article about mouth-body connection...

How To Promote Healthy Dental Habits For Your Children

Posted on May 26, 2017 at 2:34 AM Comments comments (8)

Getting your kids to adopt healthy dental habits is crucial to having a strong smile for life! The habits you teach your kids now will follow them into adulthood. Having your kids brush and floss for healthy teeth and gums will help them learn how important it is to care for their smile. Starting your kids off right shouldn’t feel like a chore—here’s how you can easily promote smart dental habits in your children!

Click here to learn more...

Do You Have Good Oral Health? Answer These Questions to Find Out!

Posted on May 15, 2017 at 12:15 AM Comments comments (18)
Having good oral health is more than just brushing every day and flossing once in a while. Your mouth is an entire unit that requires regular care—both at-home and in the dentist’s chair! As we age, our mouths become more susceptible to oral health problems like gum disease, so taking proper care of our teeth and gums is vital.

How can you know if you have good oral health? By answering these questions, you can find out where you stand when it comes to excellent oral hygiene!

Do You Follow the Two Minutes Two Times Rule?

The two minutes two times a day rule refers to brushing your teeth. This means that for two minutes two times a day, you should be gently brushing your teeth! Do you brush your teeth for the full two minutes, and do you actually take the time to brush twice a day? If you answered no to even one of these questions, you could be setting yourself up for subpar oral health!

Do You Floss After Meals?

Flossing once a day is crucial to help clean the surfaces of your teeth that your toothbrush can’t reach. By flossing after meals, you can effectively remove plaque and trapped food particles that would otherwise affect the protective enamel layer of your teeth. Floss is easy to keep with you and flossing can help clean teeth and gums better than brushing alone.

Are You Eating a Healthy Diet?

What we eat has a huge impact on our health. Eating lots of sugary foods will create an imbalance of good and bad oral bacteria in your mouth. When the bad bacteria take over, your mouth becomes acidic and your enamel is subject to damage. This can cause cavities, sensitive teeth, and bad breath! By eating a well balanced diet with lots of fresh vegetables, lean protein, and healthy fats, you can maintain excellent oral health.

How Often Do You Replace Your Toothbrush?

If it’s been more than three months since you’ve replaced your toothbrush, you’ve got a problem. Soft- bristled toothbrushes are the best kind to have since they’re gentle on your teeth. Your soft-bristled toothbrush doesn’t have to fray to mean it needs to be replaced. Dentists agree that three months is the maximum amount of time before getting a new one due to its daily use and bacteria exposure!

Do You Smoke?

Smoking greatly increases your risk for oral diseases, including gum disease and oral cancers. If you smoke or use tobacco products, quitting can help restore your oral health. Talk to your dentist about setting a date to quit!

How Often Do You Visit Your Dentist?

Speaking of dentists, how often do you visit yours? You should be visiting your dentist at least once a year, ideally every six months. Some people may need to see the dentist more often, some less often. Your dentist can assess your oral health and let you know what’s appropriate for you. Visiting your dentist can not only help prevent oral health issues, but also keeps your mouth clean and healthy!

So how good is your oral health based on your answers? Maintaining proper oral health is a habit that’s easy to make. By ceasing use of tobacco products, eating a balanced diet, and visiting your dentist, you can help your smile to stay healthy for life. Of course don’t forget to brush and floss—and replace that toothbrush if it’s been longer than three months!

The Impact of Liquid Diets on Your Teeth

Posted on January 30, 2017 at 3:50 PM Comments comments (15)
Liquid diets are all the rage. We’re bombarded daily with advice on how juicing can cleanse the body, the benefits of protein shakes as meal replacements, and even drinking tea to keep sickness at bay. While liquid diets do have value, they can be destructive to the teeth if you’re not careful.

“The biggest problem with liquid diets is the act of bathing your teeth in a liquid all day—they can be especially harmful if the liquid is acidic or has added or natural sugar,” said Cherri Kading, RDH, MS, director of clinical operations at Texas A&M University Baylor College of Dentistry. “Tooth decay and erosion of tooth enamel are the biggest concerns associated with liquid diets.” Like the name suggests, a liquid diet is when the majority of a person’s calorie intake comes from drinking liquids. Some liquid diets are limited to fruit or vegetable juices, or even shakes that replace all of your meals. While many liquid diets are personal choices, some need medical supervision.

Certain liquid diets like juicing do have related health benefits, but Kading emphasized some fruits are better than others for your teeth. “Apples, pineapples and grapes have more sucrose than fruits like berries and pears,” she said. “Fruits are good for us, but we need to be mindful of how much sugar we’re exposing the mouth to.”

According to Kading, sugar and acids are some of the leading culprits behind tooth decay. “Sports drinks, soft drinks, and even some fruit juices are extremely acidic,” she said. “If you drink these chronically they can cause erosion, which is like a “melting away” of the enamel. Sugar content in these drinks is troublesome, too, because sugar feeds the bacteria that live on the teeth and eventually causes decalcification—the beginning process of a cavity.”

The amount of liquid and how often we drink it per day is also key. “We need to ask ourselves how often are we drinking our tea, coffee or soft drinks,” Kading said. “If you’re constantly sipping on something that contains sugar or acid, your mouth never has time to recover from the effects these ingredients may cause. Saliva is what neutralizes the mouth, and it’s important to give the mouth a break from both acid and sugar so the saliva can do its job.”

Worth noting, water is the only liquid acceptable to sip all day. Kading stressed those who partake in liquid diets should always be drinking water along with any other liquids. “If you’re drinking water, this will help dilute, flush and cleanse the mouth,” she said.

If you’ve recently had oral or jaw surgery, liquids may be your only nutrient option—at least for a little while. Kading said health care professionals should always educate their patients on the cavity process, so they understand why proper care of the teeth is essential while on a liquid diet.

“You can’t just send the patient off with a special toothbrush or floss and tell them to use it. You have to tell them why it’s important,” she said. “If the patient doesn’t understand the ‘why’ behind proper oral care during a liquid diet, they are likely not to stick with their oral care regimen. Patients need to know not to sip on acidic drinks, to watch sugar intake and always rinse with water.”

But, don’t think liquid diets are all bad for the mouth. “There can be some benefits to liquid diets,” Kading said. “One is that liquids wash over your teeth and are easily rinsed out with water. The best way to approach a liquid diet is drink your shake or juice, rinse with water and then be done with it. The real harm lies in sipping on drinks and keeping your mouth awash in acids and sugar all day.”

Baby Teeth Care Basics

Posted on December 22, 2016 at 2:06 AM Comments comments (5)
It's never too early to start taking good care of your baby's teeth. Here are some baby teeth care basics:

- Prevent early childhood caries, also known as baby bottle tooth decay, by making sure baby doesn't sleep with a bottle containing any sugary liquids -- even breast milk. And never give your child a pacifier that's been dipped into anything sweet.

- Start brushing baby teeth as soon as the first tooth appears. Routine baby dental care should also include massaging the gums with a clean gauze pad. When all teeth have erupted, floss at least once a day to help prevent the buildup of dental plaque.

- Wean your baby off thumb-sucking if he or she is still doing so by age four. Otherwise, it can cause overcrowded or crooked teeth.

- Consider a combination of fluoride treatment and dental sealants, thin plastic coatings applied on baby molars to keep dental plaque from accumulating. Talk to your dentist before giving your child any fluoride dental treatment and have your child use only un-fluoridated toothpaste until two years of age.

- Take your child to the dentist after the first tooth arrives or by age one. Regular dental visits combined with daily baby teeth care can help give your baby a good head start on the road to dental health.

Closing spaces using cosmetic resin veneers

Posted on November 3, 2016 at 7:34 PM Comments comments (1)
















This patient has advanced periodontal disease with severe bone loss, mobile teeth and spaces between lower anterior teeth. We placed direct resin veneers to close the spaces and stabilize the mobile teeth.

Tough Brushing Tortures Teeth

Posted on July 17, 2016 at 3:24 PM Comments comments (1)

Most dentists don’t go a day without seeing patients who are damaging their teeth and gums by brushing too hard. Some report that as many as two out of three patients brush their teeth too hard. This is a problem. A stiff-bristled toothbrush combined with overzealous brushing teeth can cause serious dental problems over time, including gum disease and tooth sensitivity.

People think that if they brush twice as hard, they will do twice as much good, In fact, overzealous brushing can cause significant damage to the periodontal tissues and bones that support the teeth. If you used the same amount of force and brush the side of your arm, you could take your skin off.  

One way to avoid damaging your teeth and gums is to purchase a "soft" toothbrush featuring rounded bristles which are less abrasive to teeth. You should hold the brush between the thumb and forefinger, not with the fist. When brushing, do not `scrub' the teeth with a horizontal, back-and-forth motion. Instead, start at the gum line and angle the brush at a 45-degree angle. Brush both the teeth and the gums at the same time. Push hard enough to get the bristles under the gumline but not so hard that the bristles flare out. It's also a wise move to limit the amount of toothpaste because it is abrasive.  

The irony is that dentists want people to brush longer, not harder. Children and adults tend to spend less than one minute at a time brushing their teeth, even though removing plaque from the mouth requires at least two to five minutes of brushing at least twice a day. Remember: brush longer, not harder.


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